Inspiring Exuberant Writing, One Dress Up at a Time

March 3, 2011

Fables- March 2, 2011

Filed under: Fables, Myths & Fairy Tales,homework — Robyn @ 3:28 pm

Write a three paragraph story retelling the myth “Theseus and the Minotaur.”

Write a three paragraph story retelling the myth “Daedalus and Icarus.”

Thursday: write your RD for “Theseus and the Minotaur;” submit to editor

Friday: test your KWO for “Daedalus and Icarus” by reading it out loud and to another person

select dress ups for your paper

Monday: write the RD for “Daedalus and Icarus;” submit to your editor

Tuesday: using your editor’s corrections/suggestions, write your RDs for both “Theseus and the Minotaur” and “Daedalus and Icarus”

Papers are due by 2 p.m. to mrsrobyn@lew.is.

February 24, 2011

Fables- Assignment due March 1st

Filed under: Fables, Myths & Fairy Tales,homework — Robyn @ 3:04 pm

Write a three paragraph paper retelling the myth “Arachne.”

Create a complete KWO for “Theseus and the Minotaur.”

Thursday: write a RD for “Arachne” and submit it to your editor

Friday: using your editor’s corrections/suggestions, write your FD

Monday: read “Theseus and the Minotaur”

create a KWO

Tuesday: “Arachne” due!

Submit papers by 2 p.m. to mrsrobyn@lew.is

February 17, 2011

Fables- Assingments due 2/22/11

Filed under: Fables, Myths & Fairy Tales,homework — Robyn @ 2:54 pm

Write a three paragraph paper retelling the myth, “The Dreadful Punishment.”

Thursday: test your KWO by retelling the myth using only your notes- out loud and to another person

select the dress ups that you will use

Friday: write your RD and turn it in to your editor

Monday: using your editor’s notes and corrections, write your FD

Tuesday: read the myth, “Arachne” on page 44 of your workbook

create a KWO for “Arachne”

Papers due today by 2 p.m.  to mrsrobyn@lew.is

Fables- 2/16/11- The Who/Which Clause

Who is ready to use an adjectival clause??  Who knows what an adjectival clause is?!  It is a group of words that describes or adds details to a noun, but don’t worry . . . . you don’t need to say “adjectival clause” to use one!  We will refer to these as the who/which clause.

A who/which clause is a clause that begins with either the word “who” or “which.”  Use it to tell more information about a person, place or thing.

Examples:

Pyramids, which still stand in Egypt, are one of the wonders of the ancient world.

King Tut, who died as a teenager, was buried in the Valley of the Kings.

Egypt, which is in the desert, depended on the Nile River.

Notice that each of the italicized who/which clauses has a comma before and after it.  That is because you could take it out of the sentence and still hae a complete sentence left.  Try it and see!  If you use a w/w clause correctly, this will always be true.

For more practice, simply throw out a noun and ask your student to tell you something about it and turn it in to a who/which clause.

The ground today . . . .          Our dog . . .         My best friend Joe . . . .         This pizza . . . .        Spiderman . . . .

Do a few verbally and then have your student write them down to get the hang of it.

A few words on the who/which clause . . .

*  You only need to use “who” or “which.”  Using both in a sentence, which would be quite frustrating, is not necessary.

*  We generally use “who” to refer to people or inanimate objects which have been personified.  The hare from the fable, who has been personified, is an example.

*  We can use “which” for inanimate objects, which are not taking on the characteristics of people.

February 10, 2011

Fables- Assignment Due 2/16/11

Filed under: Fables, Myths & Fairy Tales,homework — Robyn @ 4:55 pm

Write a three paragraph paper retelling the myth “The Gift of Fire.”

Thursday: test your KWO by retelling the myth out loud and to another person

brainstorm for dress ups

Friday: begin writing your RD; turn in to your editor

Monday: using your editor’s corrections/suggestions, write your FD

Tuesday: Turn in your paper by 2 to mrsrobyn@lew.is

February 3, 2011

Fables- Assignment due 2/9/11

Filed under: Fables, Myths & Fairy Tales,homework — Robyn @ 3:09 pm

Write three paragraphs retelling the myth, “Jason and the Argonauts.”

Thursday: test your KWO by reading out loud to another person

brainstorm and select the dress ups that you will use in your story

Friday: begin writing  your RD

Monday: complete your RD and turn it in to your editor

Tuesday: using the corrections/suggestions from your editor, write up your FD

FD due by 2 p.m. to mrsrobyn@lew.is

Fables- February 2, 2011- Unit 3: Summarizing Narratives

This outline format is different from the one you have learned so far.  In Units I & II you took notes for each sentence in the source text.   In Unit III, you will use The Story Sequence Chart to ask yourself questions about the story.  Put the answers in a three paragraph outline format.

Section I introduces the reader to the main characters and setting. Stories usually begin by introducing their readers to the time and place of the story.  This is called the setting. Also at their beginnings, stories must introduce their readers to the main people (or animals) of the story- the characters.

Section II contains the conflict and plot. For a story to be interesting, it must move into the next crucial element – the conflict. This is the problem, want or need of the main character(s).  Stories without some sort of problem to overcome, or need to be met, are not very interesting.  Most of the action of the story is simply how the conflict is dealt with- what the characters do, say, think or feel with respect to the conflict.  This is the plot.

Section III concludes with the climax, resolution and theme and this is usually the most interesting part of the story.  If there is a conflict or a problem, there must be a way to solve it!  We call the event that leads to the problem being solved the climax.  Then come the results.  The resolution shows what happens after the climax.  By the end of the story, the characters and the reader have learned a lesson.  What is the last line of a fable always named?  Yes, the moral.  Another word for moral is the theme of the story.

Here is the chart about the sequence of stories:

The Story Sequence Chart

I.

Who is in the story?

What are they like?

Where did they live, go?

When did they live?

What was their situation?

II.

What was the problem?

-happened?

-did they think?

-did they say?

-did they do?
III.

Climax

How was the problem solved?

What was the moral or message?
*Try to create an interesting title by choosing 3 words from your very last sentence (The Final Clincher) and repeating them for your title!  We will talk more about this next week.

January 27, 2011

Fables- Assignment due 2/1/11

Filed under: Fables, Myths & Fairy Tales,homework — Robyn @ 3:46 pm

Write one paragraph retelling the fable “The Milkmaid and her Pail.”
Write one paragraph retelling the fable “The Fox and the Stork.”

Thursday: test your KWO by retelling “The Milkmaid” out loud and to another person

write up your RD and turn it in to your editor.

Friday: read “The Fox and the Stork.”

create a KWO.

using your editor’s notes/corrections, write your FD for “The Milkmaid.”

Monday: test your KWO by retelling “The Fox & the Stork” out loud and to another person.

brainstorm for dress ups.

write your RD; turn RD in to editor.

Tuesday: using your editor’s notes/corrections, write your FD.

Email assignments (together or separately) to mrsrobyn@lew.is by 2 p.m.!

Fables- “-ly words” January 26, 2011

-ly Words Adding strong verbs certainly makes our reading more exciting, but adding -ly words adds even more detail.  An -ly word is a word that ends in -ly, and it is usually an adverb and will tell how the verb was done.    For example, how did the hunters tie the lion?

The hunters tied him hastily.

And, the mouse expertly gnawed the ropes.

Refer to your handout on -ly words for a refresher.  Be sure to file this handout in your “Stylistic Techniques” section of your binder.  Place it behind your style chart.

For suggestions on -ly words, refer to the list of adverbs handout which should be filed under “Word Lists.”

January 20, 2011

Fables- Assignment due 1/25/11

Filed under: Fables, Myths & Fairy Tales,homework — Robyn @ 8:38 pm

Write one paragraph retelling the fable “The Mouse and the Lion,” and one paragraph retelling the fable “The Four Oxen and the Lioness.”

Thursday: retell “The Mouse and the Lion” out loud and to another person using only your KWO.

Write the RD (rough draft), including one of each dress up we learned yesterday, and turn it in to your editor.

Friday: read “The Four Oxen and the Lioness.”

Create a KWO.

Retell the myth out loud and to another person using only your KWO.

Brainstorm for dress ups.

Monday: Write your RD and turn it in to your editor.

Using your editor’s corrections, begin writing the FD (Final Draft) for each of your fables.

Tuesday: Complete each of the two FDs.

Homework is due by 2 p.m. today!  :)

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